Sunday, November 20, 2005

Wrap-up of Weekend Herb Blogging #7

It's Sunday night, so the weekend is nearly officially over. (Sigh.) Once again, it was a great weekend for food bloggers to tell us about their interesting herbs, plants, veggies, or flowers, growing or otherwise. Here's a recap of Weekend Herb Blogging posts from around the world.

This week we had a new herb blogger who was the first to report about his post. Brett who writes the outstanding blog In Praise of Sardines wrote about cardoons, a relative of the artichoke, which is considered a winter vegetable in Italy, Spain, and France, but also grows in California at this time of year. (See you have learned something already.) Then Brett gave us a recipe for a great salad featuring cardoons from a former chef of Chez Panisse, no less.

Next was Ruth from Once Upon a Feast who was feeling a tiny bit of wintertime blues up in snowy Toronto. She reports that most of her herbs are buried in the white stuff, but she still likes to see other people's herbs on her computer. Luckily she cheered up enough to make a yummy sounding dinner featuring parsley and mint, among other herbs. Ruth is writing a cookbook and her recipes sound great.

Then came Cookiecrumb from I'm Mad and I Eat who is mad that her Meyer Lemon tree doesn't seem to be flourishing, among other things. As always the adorable Bean Sprout managed to sneak into the shot, which has to make Cookiecrumb less mad, because any photo with that darling dog has to be a good picture. (I wish I had a lemon tree!)

Another new participant this week was Ed Charles from Melbourne, who writes the fun blog Tomato. (Isn't that just the perfect name for a food blog?) Ed has a great new camera which he showed off with an equally great photo of chives growing in a discarded pasta pan. Be sure to check out his steak sandwich photo too, while you're visiting.

Next up was Farmgirl showcasing some very healthy looking flat parsley. Farmgirl used some of that parsley recently to garnish an amazing looking bowl of lentil soup she created. For sure I am going to make that soup! I have it on my list of recipes to try. While you're there seeing the parsley and the soup be sure to check out the great new blog header at Farmgirl's place.

Then came Squeezeweasel who writes a blog called Gastronomy Domine from Cambridge, England. She shows us some lavendar, lemon thyme, Rowan berries, and wild English roses. She also managed to earn my respect by reporting about deadheading her flowers, something I haven't done nearly enough of since I became so obsessed with blogging. (Can you imagine how excited my fourth graders would be to know that I am blogging with someone named Squeezeweasel?)

Back from her cruise and feeling appropriately un-hungry, Sweetnicks was next to report in about some wonderful Yukon Gold potatoes that she roasted with fresh herbs. In case you don't know, Sweetnicks was the co-creator of WHB when she told me to go ahead and blog about my plants if I didn't have a dog or a cat, and she hosts Weekend Dog Blogging on the weekends.

Master photographer Ilva from Lucullian Delights was next up with a lovely photo of wild chives growing by the side of the road. Ilva is lucky enough to live in Tuscany and features some amazing photos of the Italian village scenery mixed in with her wonderful food photos. When I read her blog I feel like I always learn something about Italy that I hadn't known before.

Another new participant was Paz from The Cooking Adventures of Chef Paz. Paz lives and cooks in New York City. She claims she is new to cooking, but it doesn't show and she demonstrates her cooking and photo skills with Spicy Roast Chicken with Tomatoes and Marjoram and delicious looking Olives with Orange and Marjoram.

Vijay returned this week from the wonderful Indian food blog My Dhaba. When he saw that I had blogged about mint, Vijay wondered whether I believed in telepathy because that is what he wrote about too. This week's fabulous post from Vijay features great photos and recipes for mint chutney and a very interesting sounding mint tea. (If you haven't been to My Dhaba before, don't miss the blogroll of Indian food bloggers.)

Next up, Heather of Heather's Space reported in from Texas with a photo of peppermint. (Mint was obviously the herb of the weekend in lots of spots.) Heather is the mother of four boys, which causes me to wonder, "When does she have time to blog?" I'd also like to know if peppermint tastes different than spearmint which is the only kind I've ever grown.

If you're a regular reader you noticed that I also featured mint this week, the last surviving herb in my garden (that I have not already blogged about). I shared some photos of my hardy mint still growing despite many nights of frost (love that new camera!) and also some mint recipes I have known and loved.

Next weekend is Thanksgiving in the U.S., but I say, the herb blogging must go on! I know some of our regulars may be out of town (reportedly CookieCrumb will be under house arrest at her mother's in Southern California), but for anyone who is still blogging, we will be reporting on the herbs on Sunday evening as always.

Now that you've had fun reading about the herbs, head on over to the recovering Clare's for Weekend Cat Blogging or to Sweetnicks for Weekend Dog Blogging. And if you are at all interested in learning more about Indian cooking (like me) you will love visiting the new weekend blogging event, My Indian Kitchen, sponsored by Indira of Mahanandi. Indira has been a WHB participant in past weeks, and tells me she will still be joining from time to time with some interesting Indian plant ingredients. In her new weekend event, Indian bloggers will share ingredients, tools, and utensils that are unique to Indian cooking.
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2 comments:

  1. Hello Kalyn!
    Yes, spearmint and peppermint do have a distinctive different taste. I have a nursery near me that has a variety of mints -- here are the ones I remember:
    Chocolate mint (another of my herbs)
    peppermint (the one I submitted for your WHB)
    applemint
    wintergreen
    chinese mint
    pineapplemint
    and of course
    spearmint
    I have tasted them while browsing around the nursery. I found I was not very fond of spearmint as a "plant" however, I do think I am going to purchase some next spring and grow it anyway. Use it for teas more than anything.

    Tootles from Texas

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sweet Kalyn-what can I do but thank you for both all the work you put in for WHB and for your too kind words! I hope your Thanksgiving will be nice, and don't worry, I will do a piece for WHB as I don't celebrate!

    ReplyDelete

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