Monday, March 15, 2010

Once a Year Recipe Favorite: Slow Cooker Corned Beef with Veggies and Horseradish Sauce

Slow Cooker Corned Beef with Vegetables and Horseradish Sauce
This Slow-Cooked Corned Beef with Veggies and Horseradish Sauce is something I make every year for St. Patrick's Day!

(Updated and added to Recipe Favorites March 2010.) Corned Beef and Cabbage is something that's a bit of a stretch for the South Beach Diet, due to the high fat content in the meat. That's why this is only a once-a-year recipe favorite for me, but I do make corned beef in the crockpot every St. Patrick's Day. The last few years I've been cooking it for my slightly Irish father, who isn't on a diet and would love to have corned beef any time of year.

If you live in the U. S. most packages of corned beef come with a spice packet included, but if you don't have one of those packets, this recipe from Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything will tell you what spices to use. Corned beef is easy to cook, but be careful not to overcook the vegetables. This year I'm going to try serving the corned beef to dad with some Roasted Cabbage with Lemon for a slightly different twist, and I might try roasted carrots and roasted potatoes (for dad) as well. But I'll still be cooking my corned beef in the crockpot, just like I have for many years.

There's not much to cooking corned beef in the crockpot; just put enough water to barely cover the meat, add spices and a few onions, and let it simmer on low for 6-7 hours, or until the meat is tender enough to pierce easily with a fork. Serve with cabbage, carrots (and even a few potatoes if you're not on a diet) for a great Irish American meal that definitely tastes good, especially if you only eat it once a year!


Slow Cooker Corned Beef with Veggies and Horseradish Sauce
(Makes about 6 servings, recipe adapted from How to Cook Everything.)

Ingredients:
1 corned beef, 3-5 pounds (flat cut preferred)
1 bay leaf
1 head garlic
3 whole cloves
10 peppercorns
5 allspice berries or small pinch ground allspice
1 whole onion
1 head cabbage, cut in 4 pieces
2 cups carrots, cut up if large
(You could add onions if you wish)

Horseradish sauce Ingredients:
3/4 cup mayo, lite mayo, or sour cream (or use a combination)
2-3 T cream style horseradish

Instructions:
Trim all visible fat from corned beef and place in bottom of crock pot.    Cut onion into a couple of pieces and place around the meat.  Pour in enough water to cover, add spices and cook on low for about 6-7 hours.

When you can pierce corned beef fairly easily with a fork, pour out most of the liquid (saving it if you want to make the "au jus" sauce below) remove onion, and add cabbage and carrots. Cook on high about 1 hour, or until veggies are tender. (If you're hanging out in the kitchen you might want to put the carrots in for a while, then add the cabbage.) You can remove the meat for part of the cooking time if you feel it is getting too done.

Optional - To make a flavorful "au jus" type sauce to serve with the meat: While veggies are cooking, skim reserved cooking liquid and simmer to reduce by half or more. (I taste it to decide how concentrated to make it. It can get too salty if you simmer too long.) If you are needing extra comfort, you can whisk a tablespoon or so of butter into the au jus when it has been reduced to the desired consistency. I find I don't need that any more, but it does give a good flavor.

Horseradish sauce: Combine mayo, sour cream, or a mixture with horseradish and whisk together. I would advise starting with a smaller amount of horseradish and tasting, then adding more until you get the amount you prefer. (You can replace some of the mayo or sour cream with milk if you want a thinner sauce.)

When veggies are done to your liking, cut corned beef across the grain and serve with vegetables and sauce.



South Beach Suggestions:
As I mentioned, corned beef isn't really South Beach Diet approved, so this is a once-a-year treat if you're following the diet. This could be a whole meal by itself, but if you have non-South Beach Dieters in the family, you might want to cook potatoes in with the other vegetables for them. If you wanted to add something else, this would taste great with Pureed Cauliflower with Garlic, Parmesan, and Goat Cheese or 100% Whole Wheat Brown Soda Bread.

More Ideas for Corned Beef and Cabbage:
(Recipes from other blogs may not always be South Beach Diet friendly; check ingredients.)
Roasted Cabbage with Lemon from Kalyn's Kitchen
Baked or Boiled Corned Beef and Cabbage from Simply Recipes
Corned Beef and Cabbage from Wicked Good Dinner
Slow Cooker Corned Beef and Cabbage from Columbus Foodie
Corned Beef Glazed in Honey and Mustard with Cabbage from Closet Cooking
River Cottage Corned Beef from Wasabimon
Crockpot Corned Beef and Cabbage from Kitchen Gadget Girl Cooks
(Want even more recipes? I find these recipes from other blogs using Food Blog Search.)

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21 comments:

  1. Horseradish is amazingly evocative to me. A little bit is so tonic, but just a teeny bit too much can really put the hurt on ya. If I manage to do my herb blogging the week of passover I will be featuring this wonderful seasoning (no corned beef, though!)

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  2. That is by far and away the best looking corned beef I've seen. You did get a really lean cut! And the horseradish is sooooo go with this. Excellent.

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  3. My neighbor years ago grew horseradish and OH MY was fresh good. Nothing better right now for a hearty fulfilling meal when the weather just doesn't know what is wants to do. Seems St Patricks day comes at a good time. beautiful meal kaylyn!

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  4. TCL, look forward to your thoughts on horseradish, whenever it is.

    Tanna, I tried to get the leanest one I could find; thanks for noticing. And yes, the horseradish sauce is great with this.

    Doodles, would love to try fresh horseradish sometime. Thanks.

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  5. Thanks for the nice reference. The Blogher article was excellent. It was a fun event.

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  6. I'm sorry but I can't let people leave comments that are just ads for other blogs, or I will be over-run with those types of comments. If you leave a comment like that it will be promptly deleted.

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  7. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  8. I repeat:

    I'm sorry but I can't let people leave comments that are just ads for other blogs, or I will be over-run with those types of comments. If you leave a comment like that it will be promptly deleted. (When your name is already a link to the blog, just leave an interesting comment and people who are interested can find your blog.)

    I am not going to change my mind about finding this annoying, so I wish people would stop doing it.

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  9. Can corned beef be frozen?

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  10. Anonymous you can freeze corned beef both when it's raw in the bag and also after it's cooked.

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  11. Love corned beef and cabbage. I try ordering this dish in most restaurants i go to so I can compare.

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  12. Corned beef is definitely one of my favorite things- so rich and salty! My father-in-law, also a South Beach dieter, will be making some for our once a year treat! Never had it with horseradish, though...interesting.

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  13. This is such a lovely plate, and a classic! We eat this meal twice a year, in one week, cooked once by my parents and once by my husband's ~ neither of whom are remotely Irish. Completely different styles of prep and delicious both ways. :)

    Your addition of horseradish sounds absolutely perfect!!

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  14. I've never found corned beef in Australia to be fatty, wonder if it's a different cut?

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  15. Neil most of the corned beef here has a thick layer of fat on top, although not a huge amount of fat in the meat. I think it's not that fatty if you cut that layer of fat off when you eat it, but the South Beach people seem to feel it's too much saturated fat. BTW, my dad devoured this when I made it for him this year!

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  16. My favorite way to make corned beef and cabbage is via the slow cooker. Your recipe is simpler than mine, but it still looks great. :) I haven't had this with horseradish before. Normally we have it with a sturdy deli mustard, but I might try your sauce this year for a change.

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  17. Wendy, I'm very partial to that horseradish sauce!

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  18. This looks so good and I'm going to make it next week. There is a horseradish mustard that my local grocery sells that I am dying to dip the corned beef in. I love horseradish too Kalyn. Thanks for the recipe!!!

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  19. Roy, you're welcome. (I can tell I need to look for that horseradish mustard!)

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  20. Hi! This looks great - I'm going to try it for St Patrick's day this year. :)

    After the meat has cooked for seven or so hours you say to "remove the onion" - but I don't see where we put in the onion. Should that be added with the meat? Should it be whole or cut up? thanks!!

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  21. Thanks for the catch!! Yes, I put the onion in at the very beginning to season the meat and broth and then remove it when I add the vegetables I'm serving with it. Will edit the recipe right now.

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