Sunday, March 16, 2008

White Whole Wheat and Oatmeal Irish Soda Bread Recipe

Irish Soda BreadEven though St. Patrick's Day is Monday, I didn't start the weekend planning to make Irish Soda Bread. Since I don't eat white flour, I don't make bread too often, but now that I've discovered white whole wheat flour and due to the arrival of Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Dayin my mailbox, that may be changing. I've been experimenting with recipes from that book after the author assured me you can make bread with all whole wheat flour. That bread post is coming soon, dedicated to Tanna, who's been so sweet about encouraging me to try yeast bread. In the meantime, it's St. Patrick's day weekend and even though I've always been a bit baking impaired, I suddenly felt like making some Irish Soda Bread.

Irish Soda BreadI wrote about Irish Soda Bread for BlogHer last year, and I saw a lot of claims that true soda bread can only have flour, salt, soda, and buttermilk. My version with a little bit of oatmeal is adapted from the Brown Soda Bread I found at More Bread and Cheese, Please. I made a very small loaf of bread which can't be considered anything but an experiment, although I gobbled down several pieces of it in nothing flat. And if you're Irish and it's St. Patricks Day, I say ignore the South Beach Diet restriction on butter for the day and have some on your soda bread.


White Whole Wheat and Oatmeal Irish Soda Bread
(Makes 2-3 servings bread, double the recipe for a standard size loaf. Recipe slightly adapted from More Bread and Cheese, Please.

(Edit, March 20: Below is the original recipe for the bread pictured in these photos. Under that is the modified recipe mentioned in the comments which I made a few days later for my dad and stepmother. I recommend the second recipe, although both were very good. Cooking instructions are the same.)

Ingredients for Original version:
1 2/3 cup white whole wheat flour
3 T oatmeal (rolled oats) grind in food processor
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
3/4 cup plus 1 T buttermilk

Ingredients for Modified version:
1 3/4 cups white whole wheat flour
1/2 cup oatmeal (ground)
1 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
1 cup buttermilk, plus a tablespoon or more if needed to moisten all flour

Instructions:
Preheat oven to 425 F. Grease or spray a small baking sheet with nonstick spray or oil.

In plastic bowl, combine flour, ground oatmeal baking soda, and salt. With large plastic spoon, mix in buttermilk until mixture is well combined. Dust hands with flour, and form a doughy ball. (I made mine into a slightly oblong shape to fit my little baking sheet.)

Bake until bread is golden on top, about 35-40 minutes. Serve hot. Bread is best eaten shortly after it's baked.

I thought this was deliciously rustic tasting, but possibly I'm not too critical since freshly baked bread is a rarity at my house! Next time I might try more oatmeal and a tiny bit more baking soda. Any other suggestions from experienced bakers will be gratefully received.

Printer Friendly Recipe

South Beach Suggestions:
White whole wheat flour and oatmeal are both good foods for phase 2 or 3 of the South Beach Diet. Obviously butter isn't recommended due to the saturated fat, but if you're Irish, splurge a bit like I did!

More Fun with Irish Soda Bread:
(Recipes from other blogs may not always be South Beach Diet friendly, check ingredients.)
Irish Soda Bread Recipes from my post at BlogHer
Irish Soda Bread and more recipes from Simply Recipes
Irish Soda Bread from Closet Cooking
Gluten-Free Irish Soda Bread from Karina's Kitchen - Recipes from a Gluten-Free Goddess
Whole Wheat Irish Soda Bread from A Mingling of Tastes
Traditional Irish Soda Bread from Baking Bites
Irish Soda Bread from Nook and Pantry
Crusty Irish Soda Bread from Melbourne Larder
Irish Soda Scones from Baking Buddies
Irish Whiskey Soda Bread from The Barefoot Kitchen Wench

Want even more recipes?
I find these recipes from other blogs using Food Blog Search.counter customizable free hit

35 comments:

  1. I'm a huge fan of white whole wheat flour, but I haven't yet tried it in soda bread (I think that will be this afternoon's project now that I have this recipe!). I know that purists wouldn't add raisins, but I do love raisins in this bread, so I might have to sneak a few in.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It looks like your white whole wheat flour Irish soda bread turned out well. It looks so good covered in melting butter! :) I started looking for the white whole wheat flour without any luck. I have a few more ideas on where to look. It sounds pretty interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I do love soda bread ('true' style or not). I've also been in a bread baking mood lately and have been searching for a good whole meal recipe - look forward to seeing what you come up with, Kalyn.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good for you Kalyn! I use both white whole wheat and whole grain pastry flour when I bake. I think they're both wonderful and almost guilt free for us low glycemic eaters. I have a whole wheat pastry flour spice cake in the oven right now!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi everyone,

    I should have mentioned that I use King Arthur Flour white whole wheat, but if people click the link they'll see it over at Lydia's blog. I'm going to make this again on Tuesday for my dad and stepmother and change the recipe just a bit like this:

    1 3/4 cups white whole wheat flour
    1/2 cup oatmeal (ground)
    1 tsp. baking soda
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1 cup buttermilk

    That will make a slightly larger loaf, with just a bit more oatmeal. I don't know if I should be increasing the soda that much but the first one I made didn't rise very much! Experienced bakers, feel free to weigh in here. I will report back on how the revised recipe works out.

    Annemarie, the bread from that book turned out great (especially considering I have no idea what I'm doing!) Christine, maybe I will even bake a cake some day, who knows? (I think my old stove with the termperamental oven might not work for cakes though.)

    ReplyDelete
  6. What a terrific option to use white whole wheat flour. I've not thought of doing that with Irish Soda bread before.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Kalyn - Oh! I don't believe I've ever had soda bread. But it sounds delicious.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I too am a big fan of the white whole wheat flour...this bread sounds great!!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I can't believe you made bread! It look so delicious. My Irish friends mother used to make the best soda bread ever. We used to eat it still warm. Yours looks delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I have been seeing a lot of soda bread in food blog world. This looks healthy and I like oatmeal in bread.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Man that would have gone great with my colcannon!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I just bought some King Arthur www flour, and so this post is a welcome inspiration. I'm curious about the book you ordered...did it come highly recommended or did you just take a chance? I've been looking for a book to get me into artisan breads.
    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Jen, the publisher sent me the cookbook to review. At first I said I didn't want to get it because I don't cook anything with white flour. Zoe assured me that I could use white whole wheat flour in most of their recipes, which is why I agreed to accept the book. Since then I've seen numerous food bloggers raving about this book. The first batch of bread I made was delicious and extremely easy to make. I do need to work on my loaf-forming technique and I want to get a baking stone, but the book is definitely a good one.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Well I finally got my dough hook and am leafing through Artisan Breadi Five Minutes a Day book and can't wait to try out a few.

    I'm heading out to find white whole wheat flour! Then perhaps I won't feel so guilty about eating bread when I should be doing South Beach.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Ruth, can't wait to see what you think when you try the book. I think you will love the white whole wheat flour! Zoe told me you may have to add a bit more water with it if the dough seems too dry.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Your bread looks so tempting. I'm making my soda bread today- with raisins. :) Thanks for the link/mention of my gluten-free version!

    And the best part of St. Patrick's Day? Spring is around the corner!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I love soda bread--and you can do so much with whole wheat flour in baking. I love whole wheat pastry flour. It's not as pale as white whole wheat, but it behaves a lot like AP flour and has a mild taste. I use it in breads, pizza dough, muffins, cookies, whatever. Thanks for the link, by the way!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I've made a few versions of Irish soda bread. Yours sounds and looks wonderful. I will have to try this! Nothing like the smell of freshly baked bread.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hi, I just found your blog while searching for Irish Soda Bread recipes. It's great & I love all the healthy recipes. I may try this with Whole Wheat Pastry flour and some raisins. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  20. What a great variation. I havenm't made soda bread in ages. Must be time to start again.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I don't know if I have tried oats in soda bread but I love the idea - my favourite soda bread is one I made this week (and hopefully will get to post in the next day or so) which has sweet potato in it - it is excellent and moist

    ReplyDelete
  22. That is brilliant! It's also funny because last night I wanted a quick bread for our soup and started my Irish Soda Bread and because I'd just followed the recipe the day before I thought well, I'll play with this one and do it with the white whole wheat. It was totally wonderful, just needed a little more buttermilk that the other with the white flour!
    Perhaps the world was just ready for this!!
    So glad to came up with this!

    ReplyDelete
  23. This looks so good! I still haven't seen white whole wheat flour in Stop & Shop yet though.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Anali if you have a Whole Foods or Wild Oats you could find it there.

    ReplyDelete
  25. For anyone who's interested I did try the slightly revised recipe at my Dad's last night and it was a bit better. I will edit the post later tonight.

    I also think that if you live where it's dry you might need a few tablespoons more buttermilk. My dad and stepmom really enjoyed the soda bread.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Oh yum! That picture is heaven. What is it about melting butter on freshly baked bread that sets the heart to flutter? It's the taste, of course! :)

    ReplyDelete
  27. Glad you liked the bread! And I agree that butter is definitely a must with this - it adds a lot to the overall taste.

    I've been working on using white whole wheat flour as well, but didn't think to use it when I made the soda bread again this year. Good idea!

    ReplyDelete
  28. This looks great, Kalyn! I have actually never tried Irish Soda Bread so today I've been on the lookout for recipes. I have a bunch of leftover corned beef and wanted some fresh bread to accompany it. I was thinking about trying half all-purpose flour and half white whole wheat but maybe I'll just dive in and use 100% white whole wheat. I've been eating too much white bread lately, anyway :-)

    ReplyDelete
  29. King Arthur White Whole Wheat is available at Trader Joe's. If there isn't one nearby check out their website. Judy

    ReplyDelete
  30. Judy, I can get it at both my grocery stores here, plus Whole Foods also has it in Utah. (Sigh, no Trader Joe's.)

    I think it's becoming more readily available.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Kalyn, I made this last night and every crumb was gobbled up (seven of us)! I doubled the "original" recipe, didn't bother to grind the oatmeal, and used just a little bit extra buttermilk, maybe a tablespoon or two. One thing I will add - Irish soda bread traditionally has an "X" cut into the top which helps with the rising, so I'd try that before I used more soda. I cut the "X" into it last night and it rose beautifully.

    Thank you so much for so generously sharing your recipes with us - for every one person who leaves a comment, there are probably at least 100 of us who are thanking you privately! I don't blog myself, but I have friends who do, and I know how much bloggers like comments. So for all of you out there who appreciate what Kalyn does, please let her know it!!!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Virginia Bluebell, thank you so much for the nice comment! It's true, bloggers do love getting comments.

    I didn't know that about the X, will have to give that a try next time.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Hi,
    I feel good to know that bread can be prepared from whole wheat flour,so I must check the article here to know more about it.

    Thanks for the recipe of Irish Soda Bread.

    ReplyDelete
  34. I decided to make corned beef and cabbage for st paddys day this year and was searching for another side to go with it and as I started looking for soda bread recipes yours eventually popped up and I thought to myself "Of COURSE Kalyn has a soda bread recipe, why didnt you just go there first you goof?!" I made it exactly as the revised recipe said and it came out WONDERFUL! I also put an X on mine, I didnt know about helping it rise better as another person had commented, I just know that most I seen have it on top! :) The main ingredient that made me decide on this recipe were the oats, I LOVE baking with oats! Your description as "wonderfully rustic" could not be more accurate, we did add a little bit of butter as well and it just made the whole experience that much better. Im thinking of doubling the recipe and forming it into a true loaf to slice for bread, or maybe using whole wheat pastry flour next time to give it a little bit of lightness? It's definitely one for the recipe box though, thank you Kalyn for another amazing recipe!

    ReplyDelete
  35. Katherine, so glad you enjoyed it. Sadly I was so busy moving this St. Paddy's day that I didn't make corned beef or soda bread, but next year!

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for joining the conversation! I love hearing from readers and even though I can't always reply to every comment, I will always answer specific questions on a recipe as soon as possible.

Comments don't appear on the blog until they're approved by me, so no need to try again if you don't see it! Feel free make your signature a link to your site if you're a blogger, but links posted within the body of the comment will never be published.

Blogging tips