Friday, October 05, 2012

Pressure Cooker Recipe for Pinto Bean and Ground Beef Stew with Cumin and Cilantro

Pressure Cooker Pinto Bean Stew
I made this delicious stew in a few minutes in my pressure cooker, but you can make it in a regular pan.

(For Phase One Fridays I highlight Phase One recipes from the past that have been my personal favorites.  I first made this delicious pressure cooker stew back in 2009, and my friend Barbara's fantastic new pressure cooker blog is inspiring me to get going on some new recipes for the pressure cooker!)

This delightful stew with pinto beans, ground beef, and cilantro is something I had for lunch three days in a row, and I completely enjoyed it each time. If you're not a pressure cooker convert, read after the recipe to see how the stew can be made in a regular pot on the stove, but obviously it's much quicker in the pressure cooker. By the way, if anyone looked at that photo and thought about chili, there's no chili powder in this, so it's definitely not chili! Actually cilantro is the predominant flavor here, so if you're one of those poor cilantro-impaired folks, maybe you'll want to search for a different stew recipe!

One thing I love about the pressure cooker is how you can start with unsoaked beans and have a wonderful dish less than an hour later. This is the pinto beans after I pressure cooked them and drained off the liquid.

Since I was only going to pressure cook the soup a few minutes, after I sauteed the onions and garlic, I added the dried and ground herbs and sauteed for a few minutes to release the flavor.

Here's how the stew looked in the pressure cooker before I put the lid on and pressure cooked for just 2 minutes, before letting pressure release slowly for about 15 minutes. You could also simmer on top of stove for about 45 minutes, adding a bit more liquid.

Pressure Cooker Recipe for Pinto Bean and Beef Soup with Cumin and Cilantro
(Makes about 6 servings, recipe created by Kalyn.)

I made this in my 3.7 quart Kuhn Rikor pressure cooker. You could use a slightly bigger model.

Ingredients:
1 cup dried pinto beans, unsoaked (or can use 2 cans pinto beans, rinsed and drained)
about 2 T olive oil, divided (will depend on your pan)
1 lb. low-fat ground beef (I use ground beef with less than 10% fat)
1 tsp. Spike seasoning
1 onion, chopped
1 T minced garlic
2 tsp. dried Mexican oregano
1 T ground cumin
1 T dried cilantro (optional, but recommended)
3 cups homemade chicken stock (or can use 2 cans chicken broth and reduce slightly to 3 cups)
1 cup liquid from pressure cooking beans (or 1 cup water)
2 T tomato paste
1 can (14.5 oz.) petite diced tomatoes
1/2 cup sliced green onions
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro (or more)
2 T fresh squeezed lime juice

Instructions:
Put 1 cup dried pinto beans in pressure cooker with 2 tsp. olive oil, add water to fill pressure cooker half full, lock lid, and pressure cook at high pressure 15 minutes. (Start to time after high pressure is reached.) Turn off heat and let pressure release naturally (about 15 minutes.) When all pressure is released, drain beans into colander, reserving 1 cup bean cooking liquid. (You can also use 2 cans pinto beans, rinsed well in a colander placed in the sink, then drained.)

While beans are cooking, heat 2 tsp. olive oil in large heavy frying pan, add ground beef and season with Spike seasoning, then saute until beef is well-browned, breaking apart with back of the turner as it cooks. When it's well browned, remove beef to a bowl.

Heat 2 tsp. more olive oil in frying pan, then add onion and saute about 5 minutes, or until onion is starting to brown. Add minced garlic and saute 2 minutes more, then add Mexican oregano, cumin, and dried cilantro and saute about 2 minutes more.

When beans have finished cooking and been drained into a colander, add cooked ground beef to pressure cooker, followed by onion/garlic/herb mixture. Add chicken stock to frying pan and simmer a minute, scraping off any browned bits and adding that liquid to pressure cooker, along with 1 cup reserved bean cooking liquid (or water, if using canned beans.) Add beans, tomato paste and can of tomaotes to pressure cooker.

Lock lid and pressure cook for 2 minutes at high pressure. (Start to time after high pressure is reached.) Turn off heat and let pressure release naturally, about 15 minutes. When pressure is released, add sliced green onion, chopped fresh cilantro, and lime juice, turn heat on and cook with lid off for about 5 minutes. Serve hot, with additional chopped cilantro to add at the table if desired.

How to Cook in a regular soup pot on the stove:
For canned beans, rinse and drain as described above. To use dried beans, you will need to soak beans overnight, drain, add fresh water to cover by a few inches and simmer until beans are soft, about 45 minutes. Follow directions as above for browning meat, browning onions with garlic and herbs, and deglazing frying pan with chicken stock. Combine browned meat, onion mixture, chicken stock, water, cooked beans, tomato paste, and canned tomatoes in heavy soup pot, adding 1 cup more chicken stock for cooking in open pan. Simmer over low heat about 45 minutes, adding a bit more water if needed. When stew seems done, add green onion, chopped cilantro, and lime juice as above and cook a few more minutes.

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South Beach Suggestions:
This stew with low-glycemic dried beans and low-fat ground beef is a great dish for any phase of the South Beach Diet. (Edit: I keep hearing from people who tell me that pinto beans aren't approved for phase one, but in the newest book, The South Beach Diet Supercharged, they are listed in the list of beans for phase one.)

South Beach Suggestions:
As long as you use lean ground beef, everything in this recipe is approved for all phases of the South Beach Diet.  Beans are a limited food for Phase One, but in a stew like this with lots of other low-glycemic ingredients, you can have a regular serving.

Nutritional Information?
I chose the South Beach Diet to manage my weight partly so I wouldn't have to count calories, carbs, points, or fat grams, but if you want nutritional information for a recipe, I recommend entering the recipe into Calorie Count, which will calculate it for you.

More Soups or Stews with Cilantro:
(Recipes from other blogs may not always be South Beach Diet friendly; check ingredients.)
Crockpot Black Bean Chili with Lime and Cilantro from Kalyn's Kitchen
Black Bean and Rice Soup with Cilantro and Lime from Kalyn's Kitchen
Chicken and Pinto Bean Soup with Lime and Cilantro from Kalyn's Kitchen
New Mexican Slow Cooker Stew from Karina's Kitchen
Pumpkin and Chorizo Soup with Cilantro from Closet Cooking
Pumpkin Soup with Cilantro from Christine Cooks
(Want even more soup or stew recipes with cilantro? I find these recipes from other blogs using Food Blog Search.)

Blogger Disclosure:
Posts may include links to my affiliate account at Amazon.com, and Kalyn's Kitchen earns a few cents on the dollar if readers purchase the items I recommend, so thanks for supporting my blog when you shop at Amazon!

This recipe was originally posted for Weekend Herb Blogging, hosted by Cheryl from Gluten Free Goodness, and managed by Haalo at Cook (almost) Anything At Least Once.

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68 comments:

ReminisceHeirlooms said...

This look so so yummy! Thank you for the recipe.

Pearl said...

oh lord. you've just convinced me to get a pressure cooker.

Murasaki Shikibu said...

I love cilantro too and I love the way you use a lot of it. :)

Reen said...

I was so excited to find your blog! I honestly could get lost for hours in it. Love it! Anyway, this pressure cooker recipe looks great. I love my pressure cooker. I use an old-fashioned one that was my mother's. Haven't upgraded to the new fancy ones. Will try this recipe this weekend. Thanks!

The Italian Dish said...

Kalyn: Well, you're obviously still enjoying your pressure cooker. I have just GOT to get one of those! Especially because I cook dried beans a lot and this seems like the way to go. Do you feel the consistency of the cooked bean is the same as doing it in regular pot? I love these chilis/soups you fix.

Patricia Scarpin said...

Kalyn, we cook beans in pressure cookers here all the time (it's not commom for Brazilians to eat canned beans).
This recipe sounds delicious and I'm sure many of us here would love it!

Kalyn said...

Thanks everyone. I'm truly loving the pressure cooker and have no regrets at all about buying it. I'm still figuring out how to use it, so if the beans are not cooked evenly I never know if it's my lack of knowledge or the method. The only beans I had trouble with were black beans, and they were pretty old. I think it's like stovetop cooking in that older beans will take longer to cook. I bought some fresh black beans and will try again.

Also glad to know that at least some of you are like me and could never get tired of cilantro! I try not to overdo it, but I could eat it every day I'm sure!

Fluffy Bit said...

What would you suggest as an alternative to Spike Seasoning? I am allergic to some of the ingredients.

ValerieAnne said...

I've had a pressure cooker for a few years. I realized recently that it has a rounded bottom which takes a LONG time on my glass electric cooktop. I wonder if there are pressure cookers with flat bottoms? Does any one know?

Joanne said...

From one cilantro fan to another...LOVE IT!

Kalyn said...

Fluffy Bit, Spike is just a general all-purpose seasoning, so any type of seasoned salt blend that you like the taste of could be substituted.

ValerieAnne, my pressure cooker is flat on the bottom.

Joanna, yaay for cilantro!

MyKitchenInHalfCups said...

The picture alone is enough to entice me . . . but I really enjoy a real bowl!

Christine said...

Your pressure cooker posts keep reminding me that I've GOT to buy one. They are so cool. Thanks for the link, Kalyn!

biz319 said...

That looks delicious - sadly no one in my family would probably touch it!

Cilantro is BY FAR my most favorite herb (probably rosemary is a close second!).

I am going to borrow my mom's pressure cooker the next time I see her to see if its worth purchasing my own.

Gloria Chadwick said...

Your stew looks absolutely beautiful! And yes, I did think it was chili at first, but you could still kind of call it chili because you added cumin. :)

The Veggie Queen said...

Even though I don't eat meat, this is a good jumping off point for using the pressure cooker to cook beans and use lots of cilantro. I bet that I can use tempeh or tofu or seitan instead.

And anyone who doesn't have a pressure cooker ought to heed your advice, and mine, to get one, especially a new one very soon.

I did know that they are used in Brazil and many other countries successfully.

Old beans don't do well with any kind of cooking.

Thanks for the post.

Gretchen Noelle said...

I may need to think about getting myself a pressure cooker. The one hour from dried to plate seems too good to be true!

One question, 1 cup dried or 2 cans - is that correct?

Mandy Cat said...

Cilantro is one of those things like Barry Manilow: you either love it like me or you hate it. There's no middle ground.

And yes, a pressure cooker is a wonderful tool to have around. When I bought mine three years ago, I had no idea how often I'd use it for everything from soups to pot roasts to chicken for chicken salads.

sudu said...

I do love my pressure cooker- its my only prized possesion from India. I make this kind of stew at least 1-2 times and will try it your way with chicken next time. Another vegetarian option would be to use garbanzo beans with tomato (ginger, garlic, cumin and cilantro of course).
A pressure cooker not only saves time also saves a lot on cooking gas bill.

sudu said...

Just wanted to add- cooking black beans in a pressure also posed some problem with me- tough and hard like stones!
Well I read somewhere it works best if you cook them without salt and then add salt and seasoning later. Haven't tried though. Will let you know when I do.

Karen said...

Kalyn
I thought of you this morning - the "human interest" story on the front page of the Wall Street Journal was about the Cilantro Haters and how it is such a love it or hate it sort of herb. Who knew??? I've always loved Cilantro and until recently had no idea it inspired such hatred! Now the WSJ is talking about it. Go figure.

Christine said...

Hi Kalyn!

I just wanted to let you know that you and your site have made South Beach so great with all of your recipes. Thanks so much and keep up the great work with everything!

Maria said...

Cilantro is one of my favorite herbs!! Happy V-day to you!

Jill said...

This looks absolutely delicious! Cilantro is also my favorite herb :)

Thanks for Sharing!

Pam said...

This has everything I love..cilantro and a pressure cooker! Plus I have about 50 pounds of ground beef in my freezer!

chuck said...

I love slow cooked dishes. The flavor is always so good. Can't wait to give this a try. Thanks!

Mandy Cat said...

I have a friend who loves Mexican food but somehow hates cilantro. When you accompany her to a Mexican restaurant you have to plan for a very long meal; she meticulously picks out every speck of cilantro from every dish where it happens to show up.

You'd think she would just change her eating habits and decide to like something else, Greek cuisine maybe.

And for the person who was asking about tough beans: I've always heard that leaving the salt and seasonings out during the soaking and initial cooking stages is essential to get tender beans.

BC said...

How would this do in a slow cooker? I don't have a pressure cooker right now, but would like to try this out. If not good in the slow cooker, can anyone recommend a low cost but decent pressure cooker?

Kalyn said...

BC, in general you can adapt most any soup or stew recipe for a slow cooker by reducing the stock (for more concentrated flavor) and maybe increasing the amount of dried herbs a little. I'd start with the same amount of stock, then simmer the stock until it's reduced by about 1/3. Canned beans would be great for the slow cooker, but if you want to use dried beans, cook them before adding to the slow cooker.

I'd guess about 2-3 hours on high or 4-5 hours on low in the slow cooker after you make those changes. Let me know how it turns out if you try it.

Sorry, but I don't know anything about other brands of pressure cookers, but if anyone else does, please chime in!

Gina said...

This looks great! My mom is Colombian, and we cook with a lot of cilantro so this is right up my alley! I will be making this soon!

Bren said...

pressure cooking is the best, hands down! I cook ALL MY BEANS in the pressure cooker. I sure hope you'll come by and take a look! Oh and cumin is my fave spice to use in my most my foods.

A Feast for the Eyes said...

This is a great recipe for a lot of reasons-- I LOVE cilantro, pinto beans and fresh lime juice. I also adore my pressure cooker. I'd choose that kitchen tool over my crockpot anyday!
Great blog!

Anonymous said...

Visited your blog today. I am a new owner of a ELECTRIC pressure cooker and just re-learning about cooking with a pressure cooker.
I am anxious to try the bean recipe.
OK

Kalyn said...

Love hearing that there are so many pressure cooker fans.

Anonymous, I've heard good things about the electric pressure cookers. Hope you like the recipe.

Claire said...

Wrestling with whether to make this or the Chili with Black Beans and Lime. (I have some ground beef I need to cook). No pinto beans, but I have pink beans which I presume wouldn't be that different. I also have some open beef stock - see that this recipe uses chicken stock. Wonder what impact that change would have? Maybe I'll just have to try it...

Kevin said...

This is a healthy and tasty looking stew!

Claire said...

I did make this a few weeks ago. Pink beans were fine. At the last minute I discovered that I had grabbed parsley not cilantro at the grocery store. It tasted great with parsley. Now I'll have to try cilantro.

Kalyn said...

Claire, of course I would always vote for cilantro but good to know it was okay with parsley.

Harry and Eddie said...

I made this the other day, even though it's still in the 90's here in Tucson. All the ingredients were in the house, so I whipped it up per your pressure cooker instructions. Yum, Yum!! Even better the second time around. Served it with chopped red onion, chunks of avocado, sour cream, a squeeze of lime and my favorite hot sauce, Arizona Gunslinger. Next time, I'll make this ahead and freeze it for a quick company dinner. Thanks!

Kalyn said...

So glad you liked it!. I think this is one of the best things I've made so far on my pressure cooker!

Brenda said...

I'm so glad you posted this again. I just found big bag of pintos in my cupboard so I'll make this later this week. Then it will show up on my blog :) I won't use a pressure cooker though, I had one explode on me once and that cured me.

Kalyn said...

Brenda, I can see why you'd be leery about pressure cookers, although the newer models are really safe. I'm sure it will be delicious made in a regular pan too!

Linda said...

I have cooked with a pressure cooker for years as did my parents and grandparents. I can't imagine cooking dry beans w/o a pressure cooker. Last year I splurged and bought an electric PC from Williams Sonoma. I can't begin to tell you how great it is. You put the ingredients in, close the lid, set the timer and walk away until you hear the beep that alerts you that it is finished. SO much easier than using a PC on the stovetop. It is hands down the best appliance in my kitchen.

Kalyn said...

Linda, thanks for that info. I recently saw on at Costco and was thinking about splurging on it.

Linda said...

Kayln,
I checked the Costco website and the PC they are selling is the Cuisinart, same as the one I bought at Williams Sonoma and the price is better. There were 5 star reviews from almost everyone that purchased one. Maybe this could be an early Christmas gift to yourself?... :)

Kalyn said...

Linda, thank you! Just put it on my Costco list.

Red Hill General Store said...

We love the way this recipe looks, hope you don't mind but we linked back to it from our blog: http://pressurecookeroutlet.blogspot.com/2011/01/recipes-for-cold-weather.html Thought our readers would benefit from your blog.

Kalyn said...

Glad you like the recipe and thanks for the mention.

Basil said...

Oh my gosh, this soup was faulous. I always love your recipes- they are marvelous, and really healthy. The lime was so different, unlike anything that I have tasted before. Great ideas!

Kalyn said...

Thanks Basil. So glad you liked it!

Susan B said...

Hi -I googled 'pinto bean pressure cooker recipe' and this came up. I made it this afternoon and it got raves. It's definately on our 'do again' list. Thanks!

Kalyn said...

Susan, glad you found the recipe and that it was such a hit.

Yvette said...

I just cooked this in my pressure cooker and I loved it. I ended up making a double batch and I can eat lunch for a few days and freeze some for another week! Yummy- thanks for posting this.
yvette

Kalyn Denny said...

Yvette, so glad you liked it!

Barbara Bakes said...

What a great hearty, inexpensive meal!

Kalyn Denny said...

Thanks Barbara, and I am hoping to find a lot more ideas from your great new blog!

Lydia (The Perfect Pantry) said...

Okay, time to buy a pressure cooker. I'm convinced.

Peter LaFrance said...

Try substituting a bottle of dark beer or ale for an equal amount of water... gives a rich flavor accent and the alcohol cooks off.

Aggie said...

This looks so hearty and warming Kalyn, the flavors sound great. I'm so intrigued by pressure cooking!

Kalyn Denny said...

Lydia and Aggie, I am sold on pressure cooking; just need to do more of it!

Peter, beer is not approved for the South Beach Diet so, I wouldn't want to use it, but feel to experiment with the recipes any way you like!

Tereza Crump aka MyTreasuredCreations said...

You can never go wrong with cumin and cilantro in a pot of beans. In Brazil those 2 things are basically the main ingredients to our daily beans. :)

Renee Goerger said...

This is one beautiful pot of stew! I love all the fall colors and the ingredient list has all of my favorites. I bought a pressure cooker last year and will now add your stew to my pressure cooker favorites!

Kalyn Denny said...

Teresa, sounds like I need to learn more about Brazilian cuisine, as I love those flavors!

Thanks Renee. Glad you are enjoying your pressure cooker!

Taste and Tell said...

I really need to get a pressure cooker! But I'm glad you included other instructions as well, because I'm a cilantro lover and this sounds wonderful.

Kalyn Denny said...

Thanks Deb, this is really good with extra cilantro!

Clean Diva said...

I guess this is another sign from above that I honestly need a pressure cooker. It looks heavenly.

Erin - ekcantcook.blogspot.com

Lynne M. said...

This looks fabulous, and I really want to try it, but I have a question: What can I use in place of the Spike seasoning? I'm allergic to some of the ingredients in it. :(

Kalyn Denny said...

Lynne, any kind of general all-purpose seasoning can be substituted for Spike. I can't recommend a specific one because I've used Spike for years, but there are quite a few good ones.

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