Thursday, November 12, 2009

Recipe for Baked Whole Wheat Flatbread with Olive Oil and Za'atar

Baked Whole Wheat Flatbread with Olive Oil and Za'atar
Delicious and easy flatbread, with or without Za'atar!

Yesterday I shared the recipe for 100% White Whole Wheat Bread with Olive Oil from Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day. That recipe makes bread dough which can be stored in the fridge and used later, and I promised that today I'd show what I made with the rest of my dough. The book has several recipes for flatbread that look tasty, and I used the flatbread suggestions from Zoe and Jeff to make this Whole Wheat Flatbread with Za'atar. My rolling pin skills aren't really up to par, but I was still pretty happy with how the flatbread turned out. It turned out to be an effective way to deliver hummus to your mouth, and I think it would also taste good dipped into hot soup.

One of the best things about blogging is meeting other bloggers and last October I met an impressive young woman named Maris Callahan who writes the blog In Good Taste. I saw her at BlogHer 09 in Chicago, and again at BlogHerFood. Maris knows I love The Spice House, and because of my recent obsession with Sumac, when she went there lately she bought me this Za'atar, a blend that contains Sumac, and sent it in the mail. What a great surprise, thanks Maris!

Za'atar is a blend of Sumac, thyme, hyssop, white sesame seed, and Greek oregano. Traditionally, flatbread is dipped in olive oil and sprinkled with Za'atar. I sprinkled the Za'atar on my flatbread before baking, and it was wonderful. This flatbread with Za'atar is my entry for Weekend Herb Blogging, hosted by Astrid from Paulchen's Food Blog this week. WHB just celebrated its fourth birthday, under the care of Haalo.

Use the recipe from 100% White Whole Wheat Bread with Olive Oil to make the dough, and you'll definitely want to chill it for this recipe, because the dough was a little challenging to roll out even when it was chilled. Start with a grapefruit-sized piece of dough, dusted with flour, and fold it under to make a ball with a smooth top.

I really wished I'd had a silicone baking mat to roll out the dough on, but I managed to get it rolled out to the shape of my baking sheet. The book says use as little flour as possible, but I did have to use a bit.

I put a piece of parchment paper on the baking sheet, with the dough on top of the parchment. If you don't have parchment, I'd oil the pan. (Of course I would be baking this on a baking stone if I had one.) When the dough was rolled out, I started preheating my toaster oven. (I would use a bigger oven if mine wasn't broken!)

I used the end of my rolling pin to make dimples in the dough which will catch the olive oil. (Next time I might use something bigger.)

Then I brushed the dough with a generous amount of olive oil, probably a little more than a tablespoon of oil.

I sprinkled a generous amount of Za'atar on over the olive oil, probably about 2 tsp. of Za'atar. The dough needs to rest a few minutes before baking.

Baking time will depend on the thickness of your bread, but mine was browned and cooked through in about 17 minutes. I didn't use the water tray to make steam for this bread, because the olive oil will prevent a crisp crust on the flatbread anyway. If you want a crisper bottom, you can remove the parchment paper the last few minutes of baking time.


Baked Whole Wheat Flatbread with Olive Oil and Za'atar
(Makes one flatbread about 8" x 11" and 1/4" thick, probably about 4 servings as a snack, dough recipe and flatbread instructions adapted from Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day.)

To make this flatbread, I used chilled dough made with recipe for 100% White Whole Wheat Bread with Olive Oil. Other dough can probably be used.

Ingredients:
1 grapefruit-sized piece of chilled dough
1-2 T olive oil for brushing flatbread
1-2 tsp. Za'atar for sprinkling on flatbread (see note)
flour, for dusting bread and to prevent it from sticking if needed

Instructions:
Break off a grapefruit-sized piece of chilled dough, dust with flour, and place on cutting board or silicone baking mat to roll out dough. (I will definitely be buying a silicone mat to make this next time. If you don't have one, you'll need some flour under the flatbread.)

Roll the dough out so it's about 1/4 inch thick and fits the size of your baking sheet. Preheat oven to 450F/230C and if you have a baking stone, put it in the oven to heat. Cut a piece of parchment the same size as the baking sheet, and put flatbread on the parchment and place on baking sheet.

Use your fingers or the end of something to make small dimples in the dough to catch olive oil. (I used the end of my rolling pin.) Brush the surface of the dough with olive oil, then sprinkle with Za'atar. Let dough rest 15-20 minutes while the oven heats.

Bake flatbread until it's browned and cooked through. Baking time will depend on the thickness of your dough, but I baked mine for 17 minutes. Let flatbread cool for a few minutes, then cut into strips to serve.

I ate this with hummus, but it would also be delicious served with other types of dip, used to dip in soup, and would be perfect to use to make Fattoush.

Note: Za'atar from The Spice House is a blend Sumac, thyme, hyssop, white sesame seed, and Greek oregano. Other blends are often used, and it can also be spelled Zahtar, Zaatar or Zatar.

Click Here for Printer Friendly Recipe

South Beach Suggestions:
This flatbread made with a dough that uses whole wheat or white whole wheat flour is great for phase 2 or 3 of the South Beach Diet. Flatbread would be great with Tuna Mousse, Deviled Ham Spread, White Bean Dip, or Parsley Hummus.

More Food Bloggers Cook with Za'atar:
(Recipes from other blogs may not always be South Beach Diet friendly; check ingredients.)
Recipe for Making Za'atar and 5 Recipes Using Za'atar from Mediterranean Cooking in Alaska
Za'atar Bread and Za'atar Recipe from Redacted Recipes
Za'atar Bread with Feta and Parsley from Not Eating Out in New York
Za'atar and Feta Pizza from The Purple Foodie
Za'atar Pita Chips from Chocolate and Zucchini
(Want even more recipes? I find these recipes from other blogs using Food Blog Search.)counter customizable free hit

16 comments:

  1. I received this book over the weekend at Foodbuzz and can't wait to delve into it more. Love za'atar!!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Looks delicious, so glad you liked the za'atar!

    ReplyDelete
  3. My college roommate's grandmother used to make za'atar bread, and it was amazing! I'm so glad to see you feature it here - it's a little known treat that deserves more publicity. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I saw this made on Diners Drive-ins and Dives and ever since have wanted to make it. I however am a horrible baker to begin with and now it has to be gluten free. I think I'm going to give it a try. I always use Penzeys spices. I just looked at their catalog and was really surprised to find they sell it too. Their blend is sans oregano. I'm headed there today and I'm going to try and adapt this recipe. Yours looks amazing!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I went to check my spice pantry and I already have Zatar. I guess I got that far and stopped. I'm wondering if I can use the Chebe all purpose mix or Breads From Anna mix to make the flatbread. There are some great gluten free flat bread recipes out there. I'll let you know if it works. I'll have to check out The Spice House. Interesting the relation with Penzeys. Thank you for the inspiration to make this. It's going to be my lunch!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Val, I love the book. I think you'll really enjoy it.

    Maris, love it!! Can't wait to make hummus and sprinkle it on.

    Marsha, it's so delicious. I might try a version with fried flatbread too.

    Diane, how great that you have it! Let me know what you come up with.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Oh Kayln....do come by and see my love for za'atar and a recipe too! This looks super!

    ReplyDelete
  8. oops....my link for this za'atar recipe is http://themadchemist-trish.blogspot.com/2009/10/zaatar-recipe-and-one-of-my-favorite.html

    ReplyDelete
  9. I've been using za'atar more lately, too. for a while, I'd forgotten how much I like it. I remember the first time I had it, at a Lebanese festival where men had heated overturned woks and were toasted bread smeared with za'atar and olive oil on these woks, over wood fires. It was heavenly.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I "have to have" the Healthy Bread in 5 min. Book. I ordered it today. Thanks for featuring it!!

    ReplyDelete
  11. OK, I made the gluten free version today and it was amazing. I cheated and used Chebe package of all purpose mix. Kneaded the dough, rolled it out, spread on lots of olive oil and sprinkled with Penzeys version of Zaatar. Baked 25 min @ 375 and it turned out great. The only problem is I can't stop eating it. So glad you inspired me to make this. I can say we will eat this every month for sure and probably more often than that. Thanks Kalyn!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I've made their master bread from the original book over and over. I joined the HBin5 group so that I would be forced to not stick on one bread in the new book.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Trish, that does look great! I can see a lot of Za'atar in my future!

    Lydia, I don't know why, but this comment just showed up a day later! That sounds wonderful. I want to try it with pan-fried flatbread!

    Anonymous, I love the book. I get a lot of books to try, but I only write about the ones that really wow me!

    Diane, that's great! So glad the gluten free version was a hit too.

    Pam, can't wait to see what breads you make from the book!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I don't mean to be rude, but I can't publish comments that aren't in English.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I have to say thanks, Kalyn, for introducing this wonderful spice blend to my pantry! After reading so much on your blog about zatar, I bought a bottle through Penzy's and I have been extremely happy with its lemony, peppery and earthy taste. I am having a lot of fun using this spice blend in so many middle eastern dishes - all thanks to you!

    ReplyDelete
  16. PJ, isn't it great! I love it that you're enjoying the Za'atar.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for joining the conversation! I love hearing from readers and even though I can't always reply to every comment, I will always answer specific questions on a recipe as soon as possible.

Comments don't appear on the blog until they're approved by me, so no need to try again if you don't see it! Feel free make your signature a link to your site if you're a blogger, but links posted within the body of the comment will never be published.

Blogging tips